How to Knit Ten Stitch Zigzag Blanket

How to Knit Frankie Brown’s Ten Stitch Zigzag Blanket

Couch AfghanTable of Contents (Top links will bring you here)
Cast-On
The Basics
How the Zigs and Zags are Made
Strip One
Zig Instructions – Strip One
Zag Instructions – Strip One
Ending Strip One
Strip Two
Zig Instructions – Strip Two
Zag Instructions – Strip Two
Ending Strip Two
Strips Three and On

I originally started a tutorial for this blanket on September 21, 2013.  Someone commented on a previous post on this blanket with questions on how to knit it.  Now you don’t know me well enough to know that I love posting tutorials for things.  They are fun but time consuming.  I never managed to find the time to finish after the first part.

Thanks to Ravelry, I get many views on this incomplete post and others commenting for more.  This post is for you.

I put my existing Ten Stitch Zigzag blanket on a stitch holder, stole the needle, and pulled out a white skein of yarn reserved for the blanket.

First things first, go check out the pattern, Ten Stitch Zigzag by Frankie Brown.  If you like this pattern-stitch style, check out the other Ten Stitch Patterns using this method.  I am not paid nor affiliated in any way with this pattern or author, other than knitting the patterns. This page is not an advertisement, though the pattern is free.  I’m here just to provide some help to others who have struggled as I did to learn the intricacies of this pattern and others like it.

Once you get it, it is fun and easy mindless knitting.  Here are a few important things to know before you start.  These are rules never broken.

  1. Zigs increase at the start of the row on the right-side of the work.
  2. Zags decrease at the start of the row on the right-side of the work.

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Cast-On

Start with ten stitches.  Use any cast-on method you prefer.  This is the only cast-on you can choose the entire blanket.  I use Long-Tail Cast-On personally for most my knits.  I always leave long tails for all starts and joins.

  • Long-Tail Cast-on (VeryPink Knits – YouTube Video) – I’ve added this one because it shows this cast-on in a different way.

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The Basics

You will be knitting the same thing over and over again.  It is the order in which you knit that makes the zig and zag.  Here are the stitches you need to learn.  Don’t worry they will be linked throughout as well.

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Strip One

How the Zigs and Zags are Made

You will always knit two rows back-to-back as you switch from a zig to a zag and back to a zig.  This causes the pattern to switch the side of the work (left and right) that increases and decreases.

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Zig Increase

You will increase with the first stitch, knit to the last two stitches, and then decrease those two into one.  This causes the right side of the right-side to zig or look like the right side of a V.  You will also always end up with ten stitches.

Regarding the increase stitch, KFB is recommended by the pattern writer and I agree. It is simple and effective for the beginning of a row.  If you have another favorite that you like, I don’t see why you cannot.  A YO increase will cause holes but if that is the look you’re going for then by all means, but the holes will change sides.

On the wrong side you will knit.

Strip One Zig Row One: KFB, K7, K2Tog
Strip One Zig Row Two: Knit

Repeat until you have completed Row One a total of ten times.  Your marker should be on the tenth ridge on the right-side of the work.
Couch Afghan
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Zag Decrease

This is what makes the pattern so interesting and yet so easy to memorize.  You will knit the Zig rows as you did for the Zag rows, except you will invert them. Knit on the right-side of the work instead of on the wrong-side. On the wrong-side of the work you will increase with the first stitch, knit to the last two stitches, and then decrease those two into one. This causes the right side of the right-side to zag or look like the left side of a V. You will also always end up with ten stitches as before.

Strip One Zag Row One: Knit
Strip One Zag Row Two: KFB, K7, K2Tog

Repeat until you have completed Row One a total of ten times.  Your markers should be on the tenth ridge on the right-side of the work. Couch Afghan

Ending Strip One

The key to ending Strip One and starting Strip Two is NINE.

The images below will show you how your bind-off row should look.  You will only do NINE repeats of the pattern.  Choose a zig or a zag, up to you.  I’m binding-off at a zag.

Couch Afghan

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Row Ten: Knit

Again, it doesn’t matter if this is a row you’re supposed to increase or decrease on, you will knit it.  You should be on the Right Side of the work.

On the Wrong Side of the work, you will bind-off NINE stitches.  Use any method you like.  Keep binding-off until you have one stitch left.

Situate your work so it looks like the picture below.
Couch Afghan

Next we will need to cast-on NINE stitches.  Use any method you prefer, where long-tail is out.  If you like the long-tail cast-on as me, you might appreciate the backwards loop cast-on.  I always use this when casting-on like this.

Couch Afghan

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Flip the work so it is Right Side up.  Your needle is at the bottom right of the work and the strip you just completed is to your left.

Strip Two and On

Each strip after the first will be completed in this method.  In fact the rows you learned on the first strip don’t change here either.  The only difference is now you’ll knit into the strip you’ve already completed.  Fun stuff, really.

Zig Increase

Strip Two Zig Row One: KFB, K8, slip st, pickup and K1, PSSO

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If you’re new to knitting, these instructions can be confusing.  Looking them all up can be time-consuming.  Usually a knitter learns these methods as they go; however even if you’re a beginner I guarantee you’ll be knitting this blanket like a pro by then end of this post.

Since you already learned KFB and the knit stitch we’ll skip those and move right on to “slip stitch”. A slip stitch is just that, a stitch you slip off the needle as to knit or purl, but you don’t knit or purl it.  The video explains how to slip as to knit and as to purl.

For this pattern, you will slip as to knit.

The next stitch is “pickup one and knit”.  This is part of the binder stitches that attaches the strip you’re currently working on to the strip you completed before. In simple terms, you are going to insert your needle into the bump of the last strip you knit.  Then you wrap your yarn around the needle and pull it through the bump.  Instant new stitch.

On a side note, there is a HUGE difference between picking up a stitch and picking up a stitch and knitting a stitch.  Stephanie Pearl-McPhee aka Yarn Harlot talks about this on her blog with Pick-up Lines.

The video below will show you the technique of picking up and knitting one stitch.  Before you watch the video and try this out on your blanket I want you to see the stitch I personally pickup and knit from.  I’ve used my stitch marker and various views to give you an idea.  Honestly, it doesn’t matter where you pickup and knit so long as you’re consistent throughout the entire blanket.  Couch AfghanCouch AfghanCouch Afghan

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The next stitch, and the last part of the binding stitch, is PSSO.  This stands for, pass slipped stitch over.  In layman’s terms, you are going to insert your left-hand needle into the stitch you slipped from left to right.  You will then lift this stitch up and over the one you just picked up and knitted.  It is somewhat like binding-off.

You will have ELEVEN stitches on your needle after completing Row One.

Strip Two Zig Row Two: P2Tog, K9

Now you flip your work over, purl 2 together (the last knit stitch and the one you picked up and knitted), and knit to the end.

You will have TEN stitches on your needle after completing Row Two.

Knit Row One and Row Two ten times until you get to your marker on the previous strip or have counted ten ridges.

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Zag Decrease

Row One of a Zag is simliar to Row One of a Zig, except you will not increase or decrease at all on this row.

Strip Two Zag Row One: K9, slip st, pickup and K1, PSSO

You will have TEN stitches on your needle after completing Row One

Strip Two Zag Row Two: P1, KFB, K6, K2Tog

You will have TEN stitches on your needle after completing Row Two

Repeat Row One and Row Two until you have ten ridges or have reached your next marker.

Repeat the instructions for Row Two Zig and Zag until you have reached the last zig or zag of the strip.

The pictures below are of the sample I knit for this tutorial.  Your strips should look similar.  The first is a view of the Right Side and the last is a view of the Wrong Side.

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Ending Strip Two

The key to ending Strip Two and starting Strip Three is NINE.  This will apply to the end of every strip.

You will only do NINE repeats of the pattern.  Choose a zig or a zag, up to you.  I’m binding-off at a zag.

Row Ten: K9, pickup and K1, PSSO

Again, it doesn’t matter if this is a row you’re supposed to increase or decrease on, you will knit it.  You should be on the Right Side of the work.

On the Wrong Side of the work, you will bind-off NINE stitches.  I recommend purling the first stitch, as in patterning, and knitting all others as you bind-off.  Use any method you like.  Keep binding-off until you have one stitch left.

Next we will need to cast-on NINE stitches.  Use any method you prefer, for continuity you should use the same cast-on as you did at the end of Strip Two.

Repeat Strip Two for ALL Strips

When you have made your blanket as big as you wish, cast-off all TEN stitches instead of just NINE.

Wash and block.

Knit or crochet a border if you like.

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5 thoughts on “How to Knit Ten Stitch Zigzag Blanket

  1. Pingback: For Brooke – ZigZag Blanket – Strip One | Crazed Purls
  2. Am I to understand from the original pattern that I downloaded that 10 ridges of garter stitch is equal to 20 rows of knitting?

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